Creativity in Business

Leadership for Innovation

Professor Hill explains that leaders at many high-profile and innovative companies have built communities of people who are both “willing and able to innovate.” They develop willing teams by pulling people together with a shared purpose, values, and rules of engagement.

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Garage-Based Innovation

The drive to invent that Bill Hewlett and David Packard shared when they launched HP in a garage decades ago is critical to organizations today. As we shift from a knowledge-based economy to a creative economy, innovation-driven companies will be the leaders. Fortunately, says Phil McKinney, creativity is a skill that can be practiced and learned, and he shares his “FIRE + PO” process for tapping human ingenuity.

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Creating Infectious Action

Brand development is shifting from an advocacy marketing model (why one should buy a brand) to an ambassador model (how you can participate in the brand). Social media offers a platform that can rapidly transmit brand messaging to an audience while letting the audience participate in the message.

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Idea Hunting

Arriving at new ideas does not require genius. Andy Boyton explains that to become an effective idea hunter, be receptive to creative inspiration from unfamiliar or unusual sources.

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Brand Race

Win brand relevance by timing your product innovations to market need (Apple), tapping underserved segments (Luna), building a robust customer relationship (Harley-Davidson), erecting barriers to competition in execution (Zappos), and becoming an exemplar brand (Prius).

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Creativity: The Pixar Process

With fascinating insights about the creative process at Pixar and Disney, Ed Catmull reminds us that whatever conclusions we have drawn, we need to hold them lightly. Though they may have been right at one time, that doesn’t mean they are right today.

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What Drives Phenomenal Success?

According to Colleen Barrett, success comes from an idea that is so simple, nobody quite believes it: customers return because they like the experience and they like the way they are treated. Her guiding rule is to hire on attitude and then train for skills, seeking individuals who will take the business—but not themselves—seriously.

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Creative Confidence

David Kelley, founder and chair of IDEO, discusses human-centered “design thinking,” which requires building empathy for the end-users of whatever product, service or environment you are creating. But empathy alone is not enough. If you want to innovate routinely, you must have a process.

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